Archive for April, 2013

hulu-selector

Description 

An effective example for web advertising is the advertising that is used on Hulu, an online website to watch  TV shows. To continue their show, the viewer must listen to some ads, but, unlike TV, he or she is able to pick what type of ads they want. The idea came about from a survey conducted from 1,500 viewers.The viewers said they more choice and greater control of advertisements.

A voice comes on asking, “Which ad experience do you prefer?” and viewers can to pick a sequence of ads that are somewhat relevant to their life. This type of advertisement–called Hulu Ad Selector–first came public when Hulu launched in 2008.

Facet of Effect

-Facet of Effect-

The Facet of Effect that Hulu Ad Selector uses the Perception effect. The most closely aligns with Perception because the perception is unique to the ad. Selection and Attention is a perception concept, and Hulu uses this by allowing users to use their own selection. Interest is another one along with Relevance, and users are able to select ads that peak their interest and are relevant to them.

-Success-

Statistics show that two-thirds of viewers are likely to pick their own ad experience.  Hulu calls this psychological ad as the “power of choice.”  Effectiveness metrics are twice as high when compared to a standard pre-roll.

Target Audience 

-Demographics-

Hulu aims to make their advertisements relevant to everyone–male, female, young, old, each person gets to pick the ad most relevant to them. The age that is most prevalent for watching Hulu is 18-24, so ads will target these consumers. This falls under the “Me Generation” and the “Generation Y.”

-Psychological-

Being able to pick their own ad experience lets people say “I Am Expressive.” They can express their personality by choosing what ads they want to listen to. Under the VALS Framework, the advertisement would appeal to people who are “Experiencers.” They can choose ads that would be most likely to appeal to them in life.

-Behavioral-

Since the ads are different, it’s difficult to put a path to purchase on it. However, the closest it would be is the Do-Think-Feel. First, viewers click on the ad they want (Do). They then think, even if it’s subconsciously, about the ads they watch, and (hopefully) feel drawn towards them.

Personal Analysis 

I believe that allowing the viewers to choose their own ads is increasing your chance a bit of viewers paying attention to the ad. I generally ignore the ads anyway, but for those who do listen to ads, they are apt to pay closer attention to something that is relevant to them, such as clothes for women, instead of golf clubs. Also, viewers have to pay attention, if only for a few seconds, to choose which ad they want.

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Marlboro Man

Posted: April 18, 2013 in Uncategorized

marlboro-man-400x400 marlboro1

 

Description 

In the late 1940s, the Marlboro company came out with an advertisement for cigarettes for women. Now, there needed to be an advertisement appealing to males and implementing masculinity. This was a time period where cowboys were particularly glorified, and Leo Burnett (head of the company) decided to use him as a figure of masculinity to sell cigarettes.

Marlboro slogans included: “Come to Marlboro Country”; “Come to where the flavor is”; and “You get a lot to like with a Marlboro.”Although the most iconic ads are the cowboy ones, Marlboro also included ads with ball players, race car drivers, and rugged men with tattoos.

 

Facets of Effects  

-Facet of Effect-

The Facet of Effect this best embodies is Feel. The Communication is Emotional/Affective. Marlboro man plays off the emotional appeal to be masculine and tough. It creates a want to be a get the cigarettes and be a man. Excitement for the potential and liking that they can buy these cigarettes and not appear feminine.

-Success-

The Marlboro Man has been considered one of the most brilliant advertisements ever. Their sales skyrocketed. By 1955, when Marlboro Man went national, the sales reached $5 billion. It was 3,241 % jump over sales in 1954. By 1957, sales reached $20 billion. When cigarette ads were banned from television in 1971, Marlboro Man was fortunate to have the magazine ad image. They became the No. 1 brand tobacco brand in the world.

However, there were some rough spots…all of the models for Marlboro Man died of lung cancer.

Target Audience

-Demographic-

The key demographic audience is the Gender, and appealing to men. In the 1940s, Marlboro came out with a cigarette ad for women, called “Mild as May.” Now they needed an ad to appeal to masculinity, and that is where the Marlboro cowboy and other rugged men came into play.

The ad–while more prevalent in the mid-20th century-was used from 1954-1999. This encompassed (assuming the targeted audience was the legal age to buy cigarettes) every generation from the Greatest Generation through the first part of the Me Generation.

-Psychological-

The VALs framework that the men targeted in this ad would fit in is the Self-Expression column, especially the experiencers. This is just one product they use to experience life. In the MindBase category, it would be “I am Expressive”–the men live life to the fullest. As evidenced by smoking, the men “live in the now.”

-Behavioral-

The Path to a Brand Decision aligns with the Feel-Do-Think (or “Wants”). Men first feel the rugged example, and how manly smoking filtered cigarettes can be. The Do part is actually buying and smoking the product. Think comes many years later…

Personal Analysis 

I don’t smoke cigarettes, nor do I fit the male target audience, but I believe this ad was successful and an excellent strategy. Men are looking for something to fulfill masculinity and toughness, just as women want products to make them feel pretty.

 

 

Description

Want an advertisement that makes people smile? An advertisement that sticks in people’s heads and is impossible to get out? FreeCreditReport.Com fulfilled both of those qualifications in their series of commercials.  FreeCreditReport.Com is owned by Experian Consumer Direct.

In October of 2007, Experian began an advertising campaign with unique jingles for every ad. The videos aired on popular new networks, and just the jingles aired on radio stations across the country. They began by using singer Eric Violette portraying a man struggling with hardships and life setbacks because he had a bad credit score and wasn’t aware of it. The commercials stopped airing in February of 201o. FreeCreditReport.Com had nine commercials, the themes being:

  • Pirate Themed Restaurant 
  • Used Car
  • Living with In-Laws
  • Bicycle Riding
  • Rock Stars Pool Party
  • Renaissance Fair
  • Roller Coaster
  • Small Town/Cell Phone Shop
  • Country Bar in Reno

Facets of Effect

-Facets of Effect-

The Facet of Effect that aptly describes the commercials is Perception. First, people are exposed to these ads in several different mediums. Their humor and jingles are definitely attention-grabbers. Free Credit does have relevance to their target audience who may be wanting to buy something and don’t know what their credit score is. This leads into the related topic of awareness. People may not be aware of needing to check their credit score before this.

-Success-

FreeCreditReport.Com had a mixed response when it came to success.

It has been in a couple of lawsuits, along with FreeCreditScore.Com (another business under Experian). In 2005, Experian was sued by the Federal Trade Commission for using deceptive tactics–misleading claims of “free” offers. These practices were addressed in 2009 Credit CARD Act. Now, any free credit ad on TV or radio must also include “This is not the free credit report provided for by Federal law.”

The general public, however, loved the commercials. In fact, consumers who loved the original band petitioned the get that band to return, which they did in 2012, releasing a couple of commercials for FreeCreditScore.Com.

Target Audience

-Demographics-

The predominant demographic in these films is AGE. The commercials focus on portraying young couples who may, in all likelihood, never used a credit report before. The men singing are young, and they are talking about things young couples would do (buy a car, buy their first house). In several of them, an old lady is looking disapprovingly at the singers. Credit monitor can be for any age. But the young people that are portrayed in this commercial and who Free Credit is probably targeting are the later “Baby Busters” and the early “Generation Me”.

-Psychological-

Under the VALs system, the target audience for Free Credit would be the “Achievers.” What are YOU going to achieve? You could achieve a job, car, or house…if you had good credit. They are also under the label “I Am Down to Earth” (even if they previously believed they were “I Am Expressive”).

-Behavioral-

This fits under the Think-Feel-Do. Their commercials create a learning and understanding of their service, which many may not know about. Their jingles provide information and persuasive arguments.

Personal Analysis 

I  loved these commercials. Even though I haven’t been in a search for a credit report/score, the commercials are humorous, and the jingles are catchy. In fact, they are easily memorizable and fun to sing back. Jingles are rather cliche, and, for me personally, the best advertising to roll my eyes at. However, there is nothing overly cheesy about these jingles while still conveying the message.

Aerial Ambassadors

Posted: April 12, 2013 in Uncategorized

goodyear

Description 

The Goodyear Blimp is any one of a fleet of blimps owned and run by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. They are used for advertising purposes, as well as being used as an aerial camera for sporting events. Goodyear began producing airships in 1911 and their own blimp in 1925, called The Pilgrim.

There are currently three blimps in the American Fleet: the Spirit of Goodyear, based in Suffield Township, Ohio near Akron, Spirit of America, based in Carson, California, and Spirit of Innovation, based in Pompano Beach, Florida.Goodyear also has blimps operating in other parts of the world. Each blimp is equipped with an LED sign, called “Eaglevision,” which makes it able to display bright words and images.

Goodyear Blimps still adorn the skies, can be seen at many major sporting events, and were listed in Ramussen’s report of top 15 guerilla marketing strategies.

Facets of Effect

-Facets-

The Facet of Effect that the Goodyear readily embodies is without a doubt the Perception Facet: See/Hear. Exposure is a factor of this, and the Blimp is placed in situations where millions are exposed to the message. Selection and Attention is another factor. The Goodyear succeeds at grabbing attention! It is the only aircraft flying over head! Goodyear also succeeds in the Recognition factor. Millions of people not only recognize the blimp, but also recall the message on it.

-Success-

Goodyear Blimps  are considered one of the most iconic advertisements in the U.S. In this strategy, success would be measured by the recognition and recall of the company. Goodyear estimates 60 million people see their 3 blimps annually.

Profile of Target Audience 

-Demographics-

Goodyear’s blimp is a way to get recognition, so they are trying (and succeeding) to reach demographics. However, they are focused a bit more on males, since they are a tire and rubber company. This is part of the reason why they focus on advertising at sporting events.

-Behavioral-

For behavioral, the path would be Think-Feel-Do. Goodyear sells tires and they don’t create a strong desire/wanting. Their blimp had information and spikes interest in what they might NEED.

-Psychological-

Picking a VALs Framework for their target audience is a bit difficult, since they really try to target everyone. However, I would say the self-expression of the experiences and makers. In the Mindbase categories, I would say their audience is the “I Measure Twice”…living an active lifestyle and working for a rewarding future.

Personal Analysis

I personally think that Goodyear’s use of blimp for advertising is a stroke of genius. They are the landmark company to use such an obscure aircraft to advertise, and the only one to do so. In fact, if I do see a blimp in the sky, I immediately associate with Goodyear. I like their strategy for success, as well. According to Goodyear, “We don’t charge for anything we do. We have our own camera gear and camera people. If we cover your event, in exchange, you show mention us and show a show a shot of the blimp.”

Future

On April 10, Goodyear announced they are working on updating their advertising. A new model of the blimp is be assembled in Akron, Ohio, by the Goodyear company and Germany company, Zeppelin. 

I’m Lovin’ It

Posted: April 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

Description 

Ask nearly anyone in the United States, and the citizens of numerous other countries around the world, where “I’m Lovin’ It” comes from, and they would mostly quickly reply with “McDonalds.” This is such a popular slogan that is quickly associated with its owners that it is hard to believe it’s been in the U.S. for less than a decade.

“I’m Lovin’ It” first appeared in Munich, Germany, on September 2, 2003. It appeared in English in the UK on September 17, Australia September 21, and the US on September 29. The first time the slogan was used was in  a commercial showing people all over the world having fun and occasionally eating a hamburger, finishing off with McDonalds’ “M” and the phrase “I’m Lovin’ It.” Justin Timberlake performed the vocals. It was a series of 5 commercials. Soon the slogan spread to all types of medium.

Facet of Effects 

-Facet of Effects-

I think the Facet of Effect this best fits is the Persuasion Factor: Believe. The Persuasion factor motivates you to do something. Watching the videos of people with high energy levels and having fun persuades you to try out the product they suggested.

-Success-

Success could be determined by the rise, in sales, but also in the recognition. Eight months after it first ran, McDonald’s conducted a survey in 10 of its top countries. The result was an 86% awareness overall, including 89% by young adults and 87% by mothers.

Target Audience 

-Demographics-

McDonald’s has chains in 122 countries, so the target audience includes all nationalities and races. The originally videos contained people from all over the globe, showing that McDonald’s is for everyone, everywhere. Nearly everyone eats McDonald’s. The older population might not eat as much McDonald’s, just because they are less likely to eat fast food. The commercials originally targeted young teenager/young adults, as shown by the age of the actors in the commercials. It spread to young families, shown by a smiling mother with a baby (also smiling) on her back. These people would mainly fit under the “Generation Y” category, and spreading a bit to the “Me Generation.”

-Psychographics-

McDonald’s target audience in these commercials would be the “I Am Expressive.” The people are constantly active, having fun, and doing crazy activities. This falls us the “Experiencers” and Self-Expression VALS frame.

-Behavioral-

The paths to choose McDonald’s by seeing their “I’m Lovin’ It” commercial is characterized by Wants, and the Feel-Do-Think. Watching their commercials makes you feel a sort of excitement and high and you want to do what they’re saying. That follows with the “Do” part of the path–go buy some McDonalds.

Personal Analysis 

I think McDonald’s picked a good slogan as a branding advertisement. It doesn’t target a specific product, but the company as a whole. The success, through recognition and awareness, is phenomenal. McDonald’s has been given countless flack for their unhealthy food. While this may be true, I appreciate that McDonald’s does not advertise a lie and say that their food is the best for you. It simply says “I’m Lovin’ It,” which, if we’re completely honest, most people do love some aspect of McDonald’s, or they wouldn’t one of the most successful businesses in the world today. Their original campaign was a series of commercials to prompt people to buy their products. Now, the phrase “I’m Lovin’ It” triggers a recognition and desire.